Current Climate

Climatology

This page presents St. Vincent and the Grenadines's climate context for the current climatology, 1991-2020, derived from observed, historical data. Information should be used to build a strong understanding of current climate conditions in order to appreciate future climate scenarios and projected change. You can visualize data for the current climatology through spatial variation, the seasonal cycle, or as a time series. Analysis is available for both annual and seasonal data. Data presentation defaults to national-scale aggregation, however sub-national data aggregations can be accessed by clicking within a country, on a sub-national unit.  Other historical climatologies can be selected from the Time Period dropdown list. Data for  specific coordinates can be downloaded for in the Data Download page.

Observed, historical data is produced by the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) of University of East Anglia. Data is presented at a 0.5º x 0.5º (50km x 50km) resolution.

St. Vincent and the Grenadines has a tropical climate, with hot, humid conditions year-round. Historically, the dry season has been from December to May and the rainy season from June to November. However, there has been noticeable changes in this pattern over the past ten years- the rainy season now lasts from May to October. The country is impacted by tropical cyclones and hurricanes, as well as the impacts of the El Nino Southern Oscillation. El Nino brings warmer and drier than average conditions between June and August, while La Nina brings colder and wetter conditions during this same time period.

Temperature

  • Mean annual temperature has increased by 0.7°C since 1960, at an average rate of 0.16°C per decade, and this warming has affected all seasons at a similar rate.

Precipitation

  • Average precipitation has declined by about 8.2 mm per month (-5.7%) per decade over the period 1960-2006. This decline affects all seasons but is most marked in the wettest seasons during June through November, when the average rate of decline had been 10.6 to 13.5 mm per month (4.9% to 7.1%) per decade.