Country

Nigeria

Explore historical and projected climate data, climate data by sector, impacts, key vulnerabilities and what adaptation measures are being taken. Explore the overview for a general context of how climate change is affecting Nigeria.

Country Summary

This page presents high-level information for Nigeria's climate zones and its seasonal cycle for mean temperature and precipitation for the latest climatology, 1991-2020. Climate zone classifications are derived from the Köppen-Geiger climate classification system, which divides climates into five main climate groups divided based on seasonal precipitation and temperature patterns. The five main groups are A (tropical), B (dry), C (temperate), D (continental), and E (polar). All climates except for those in the E group are assigned a seasonal precipitation sub-group (second letter).  Climate classifications are identified by hovering your mouse over the legend. A narrative overview of Nigeria's country context and climate is provided following the visualizations.


Köppen-Geiger Climate Classification, 1991-2020
  • Af
  • Am
  • As/Aw
  • BWh
  • BWk
  • BSh
  • BSk
  • Csa
  • Csb
  • Csc
  • Cwa
  • Cwb
  • Cwc
  • Cfa
  • Cfb
  • Cfc
  • Dsa
  • Dsb
  • Dsc
  • Dsd
  • Dwa
  • Dwb
  • Dwc
  • Dwd
  • Dfa
  • Dfb
  • Dfc
  • Dfd
  • ET
  • EF

The Federal Republic of Nigeria is located in West Africa between the latitudes of 4-14° N and longitudes of 3-15° E and spanning an area of 923,768 km2. A key regional player in West Africa, with approximately 184 million inhabitants, Nigeria accounts for 47% of West Africa’s population, and has one of the largest population of youth in the world. Between 2006 and 2016, Nigeria’s gross domestic product (GDP) grew at an average rate of 5.7% per year, as volatile oil prices drove growth to a high of 8% in 2006 and to a low of -1.5% in 2016. Between 2005 and 2015, Nigeria’s Human Development Index value increased by 13.1%. However, the country continues to face massive developmental challenges, which include reducing the dependency on oil and diversifying the economy, addressing insufficient infrastructure, and building strong and effective institutions, as well as governance issues, public financial management systems, human development indicators, and the living conditions of the population.

Because Nigeria’s economy is dependent on climate-sensitive and climate-impactful industries (e.g. agriculture, forestry, extraction) climate change threatens to exacerbate its vulnerability to extreme weather events and limit economic growth in certain sectors. The county has ratified the Paris Agreement and submitted its first Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) in 2017. The National Adaptation Strategy and Plan of Action for Climate Change Nigeria (NASPA-CCN) describes its adaptation priorities, bringing together existing initiatives and priorities for future action.