Climate Change Overview

Country Summary

This page presents high-level information for Slovak Republic's climate zones and its seasonal cycle for mean temperature and precipitation for the latest climatology, 1991-2020. Climate zone classifications are derived from the Köppen-Geiger climate classification system, which divides climates into five main climate groups divided based on seasonal precipitation and temperature patterns. The five main groups are A (tropical), B (dry), C (temperate), D (continental), and E (polar). All climates except for those in the E group are assigned a seasonal precipitation sub-group (second letter).  Climate classifications are identified by hovering your mouse over the legend. A narrative overview of Slovak Republic's country context and climate is provided following the visualizations.

Köppen-Geiger Climate Classification, 1991-2020
  • Af
  • Am
  • As/Aw
  • BWh
  • BWk
  • BSh
  • BSk
  • Csa
  • Csb
  • Csc
  • Cwa
  • Cwb
  • Cwc
  • Cfa
  • Cfb
  • Cfc
  • Dsa
  • Dsb
  • Dsc
  • Dsd
  • Dwa
  • Dwb
  • Dwc
  • Dwd
  • Dfa
  • Dfb
  • Dfc
  • Dfd
  • ET
  • EF

The Slovak Republic is a landlocked country located in Central Europe that shares borders with Austria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Ukraine. The Slovak Republic has a total area of 49,034 km2. It is a naturally diverse country with the west and the north are covered by the Western Carpathian Mountains and large lowlands cover the south. Agricultural soil covers 49.5%, forest soil 41%, water 1.9% and 4.9% is covered by built-up areas. The country has a population of over 5.4 million (2020) people. Besides towns, the population is concentrated in lowlands and basins, highlands and mountains are populated very sparsely. The country’s economy is supported by its services, industry, manufacturing, construction, and agriculture sectors. The country is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change from extreme weather events, such as increase in precipitation and temperature, which increases the risk of flooding. These impacts also effect its key economic sectors, such as agriculture.