Climate Change Overview

Country Summary

This page presents high-level information for Slovenia's climate zones and its seasonal cycle for mean temperature and precipitation for the latest climatology, 1991-2020. Climate zone classifications are derived from the Köppen-Geiger climate classification system, which divides climates into five main climate groups divided based on seasonal precipitation and temperature patterns. The five main groups are A (tropical), B (dry), C (temperate), D (continental), and E (polar). All climates except for those in the E group are assigned a seasonal precipitation sub-group (second letter).  Climate classifications are identified by hovering your mouse over the legend. A narrative overview of Slovenia's country context and climate is provided following the visualizations.

Köppen-Geiger Climate Classification, 1991-2020
  • Af
  • Am
  • As/Aw
  • BWh
  • BWk
  • BSh
  • BSk
  • Csa
  • Csb
  • Csc
  • Cwa
  • Cwb
  • Cwc
  • Cfa
  • Cfb
  • Cfc
  • Dsa
  • Dsb
  • Dsc
  • Dsd
  • Dwa
  • Dwb
  • Dwc
  • Dwd
  • Dfa
  • Dfb
  • Dfc
  • Dfd
  • ET
  • EF

 

Slovenia is located in Central Europe with geographic coordinates of approximately 46°N latitude and 15°E longitude. The surface area of the territory is 20,273 km2 and its coastline length is about 46 km. Slovenia shares boarders with Austria in the north, Hungary in the east, Croatia in the south and Italy in the west. The majority of its surface (58.4%) is covered by forests. Slovenia’s population is approximately 2.1 million (2020) people, of which 54% live in urban areas. Slovenia’s economy is driven by its service, industry, construction, and agriculture sectors. Slovenia’s climate is extremely diverse. Near the coast, the prevailing type of climate is sub-Mediterranean, in mountains Alpine, while a continental climate prevails in the flat parts of eastern Slovenia. These climate types interact and together with local influences form a wide range of local climatic conditions. Slovenia is vulnerable to the impacts of climate change from extreme weather events, such as heave waves, forest fire, floods, and drought, and changes in climate variables.