Country

Japan

Explore historical and projected climate data, climate data by sector, impacts, key vulnerabilities and what adaptation measures are being taken. Explore the overview for a general context of how climate change is affecting Japan.

Current Climate Climatology

This page presents Japan's climate context for the current climatology, 1991-2020, derived from observed, historical data. Information should be used to build a strong understanding of current climate conditions in order to appreciate future climate scenarios and projected change. You can visualize data for the current climatology through spatial variation, the seasonal cycle, or as a time series. Analysis is available for both annual and seasonal data. Data presentation defaults to national-scale aggregation, however sub-national data aggregations can be accessed by clicking within a country, on a sub-national unit.  Other historical climatologies can be selected from the Time Period dropdown list. Data for  specific coordinates can be downloaded for in the Data Download page.

Observed, historical data is produced by the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) of University of East Anglia. Data is presented at a 0.5º x 0.5º (50km x 50km) resolution.

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Climate Data Historical

Japan stretches over a great distance from north to south, with its most southern point of the whole land including remote islands located at 20 degrees north latitude, and the most northern point at 46 degrees north latitude. With such a structure, various climate zones exist in the islands of Japan such as subarctic, extratropical and subtropical zone.

Temperature

  • Long-term trends of annual mean surface temperature anomalies from 1898 to 2016 in Japan. The annual mean temperature anomalies in Japan fluctuates on different time scales ranging from years to decades.
  • The annual mean surface temperature over Japan has risen at a rate of 1.19°C per century.
  • Similarly, it is virtually certain that the seasonal mean temperatures for winter, spring, summer and autumn have risen at rates of about 1.11, 1.38, 1.08 and 1.20°C per century, respectively.
  • The temperature anomaly for 2016 is estimated to have been 0.88°C, which is the highest since statistics began in 1898.

Precipitation

  • The annual number of days with precipitation over 200mm is extremely likely to have increased, whereas for the annual number of days with precipitation ≥ 1.0mm is virtually certain to have decreased.

This section provides the options to visualize historical climate data for different timeframes via map and annual cycle chart.

 

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