Country

Venezuela

Explore historical and projected climate data, climate data by sector, impacts, key vulnerabilities and what adaptation measures are being taken. Explore the overview for a general context of how climate change is affecting Venezuela.

Country Summary

This page presents high-level information for Venezuela's climate zones and its seasonal cycle for mean temperature and precipitation for the latest climatology, 1991-2020. Climate zone classifications in the map below use observed, historical data (sourced from the Climate Research Unit [CRU]) and are derived by applying the Köppen-Geiger climate classification methodology. This classification divides climate into five primary climate groups, which are divided based on seasonal precipitation and temperature patterns. The five primary groups are A (tropical), B (dry), C (temperate), D (continental), and E (polar). All climates, except for those in the E group are assigned a seasonal precipitation sub-group (second letter). It is important to understand the different climate contexts that exist within a country as well as the surrounding region when analyzing current climates and projected change. Climate classifications are identified by hovering your mouse over the legend. A narrative overview of Venezuela's country context and climate is provided following the visualizations.


Köppen-Geiger Climate Classification, 1991-2020
  • Af
  • Am
  • As/Aw
  • BWh
  • BWk
  • BSh
  • BSk
  • Csa
  • Csb
  • Csc
  • Cwa
  • Cwb
  • Cwc
  • Cfa
  • Cfb
  • Cfc
  • Dsa
  • Dsb
  • Dsc
  • Dsd
  • Dwa
  • Dwb
  • Dwc
  • Dwd
  • Dfa
  • Dfb
  • Dfc
  • Dfd
  • ET
  • EF
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Venezuela is located in the northern coast of South America. The country borders the Caribbean Sea to the north, the Co-operative Republic of Guyana and the Atlantic Ocean to the east, the Federal Republic of Brazil to the south, and the Republic of Colombia to the west. The Venezuelan economy depends heavily on oil exports, which account for almost all export earnings and nearly half of the government’s revenue (2017). The country’s population is approximately 28.4 million (2020) people. 

The effects of climate change have already been experienced in Venezuela, which used to have five glaciers in 1991 and today, only one remains. The last glacier in Venezuela, the Humboldt glacier, is expected to disappear within a decade or two. The rapid glacier retreat affects the water cycle in glacier-dependent basins, which changes water availability.